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Friday, April 17, 2020 | History

2 edition of Ethnobotany of the Ojibwe Indians found in the catalog.

Ethnobotany of the Ojibwe Indians

Huron Herbert Smith

Ethnobotany of the Ojibwe Indians

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  • 22 Currently reading

Published by Published by order of the Trustees in Milwaukee, Wis .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Ojibwa Indians.,
  • Botany -- Wisconsin.,
  • Botany -- Minnesota.,
  • Botany, Economic.,
  • Indians of North America -- Medicine.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Huron H. Smith.
    SeriesBulletin of the Public Museum of the city of Milwaukee -- v. 4, no. 3. May 2, 1932., Bulletin (Milwaukee Public Museum) -- v. 4, no. 3.
    The Physical Object
    Paginationp. [329]-524.
    Number of Pages524
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL16595854M

    History Ojibwe Culture Intro %20flipbook/?page=1 Go ask an Elder with Nancy Jones - various culture questions answered.


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Ethnobotany of the Ojibwe Indians by Huron Herbert Smith Download PDF EPUB FB2

I stumbled across your webpage today while searching for Huron Smith's "Ethnobotany of the Ojibwe Indians". I'm wondering if anyone who maintains this website may be aware of stories about Ojibwe traditional fire use (prescribed fire) for the tending of specific plant communities desired for food, medicine, baskets, or any other needs.

] SMITH, ETHNOBOTANY OF THE OJIBWE. FOREWORD. This bulletin is the third in a series of six, recounting the field work done among Wisconsin Indians to File Size: KB. Read "Ethnobotany of the Ojibwe Indians" by Huron H. Smith available from Rakuten Kobo.

This bulletin is the third in a series of six, recounting the field work done among Wisconsin Indians to discover their Brand: Anboco.

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Smith, Huron H. (Huron Herbert), Ethnobotany of the Ojibwe Indians. Milwaukee, Wis., Published by order of the trustees []. "Ethnobotany of the Ojibwe Indians" by Huron H.

Smith. Ethnobotany of the Ojibwe Indians book Published by Good Press. Good Press publishes a wide range of titles that encompasses every genre. From well-known classics & literary fiction and non-fiction to forgotten−or yet undiscovered gems−of world literature, we issue the books that need to be : Huron H.

Smith. "Ethnobotany of the Ojibwe Indians" by Huron H. Smith. Published by Good Press. Good Press publishes a wide range of titles that encompasses every genre.

From well-known classics & literary fiction and non-fiction to forgotten−or yet undiscovered gems−of world literature, we issue the books that need to be : Good Press. Buy Ethnobotany of the Ojibwe Indians on FREE SHIPPING on qualified orders.

Ethnobotany of the Ojibwe Indians - Kindle edition by Smith, Huron H. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Ethnobotany of the Ojibwe Indians.5/5(1).

Title: Ethnobotany of the Ojibwe Indians Author: Huron H. Smith Release Date: J [EBook #] Language: English Character set encoding: UTF-8 *** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK ETHNOBOTANY OF THE OJIBWE INDIANS *** Produced by Betsie Bush, David Edwards, Raymond Bush, and the Online Distributed Proofreading Team.

About this Book Catalog Record Details. Ethnobotany of the Ojibwe Indians, by Huron H. Smith. Smith, Huron H. (Huron Herbert), View full catalog record.

Rights: Public Domain, Google-digitized. This bulletin is the third in a series of six, recounting the field work done among Wisconsin Indians to discover their present uses of native or introduced plants and, insofar as is possible, the history of these plant uses by their ancestors.

As far back as Hoffman[85] reported that the medicinal lore of the Ojibwe would soon be gone. Ethnobotany of the Ojibwe Indians by Huron H. Smith Title: Ethnobotany of the Ojibwe Indians Language: English: LoC Class: E History: America: America: Subject: Ojibwa Indians -- Ethnobotany Subject: Plants -- Wisconsin Similar Books.

Readers also downloaded Download This eBook. Format Url Size; Read this book online. Genre/Form: Electronic books: Additional Physical Format: Print version: Smith, Huron H. Ethnobotany of the Ojibwe Indians. Dinslaken: anboco, © The Ojibwe, Ojibwa, Chippewa, or Saulteaux are an Anishinaabe people of Canada and the northern Midwestern United are one of the most numerous indigenous peoples north of the Rio Canada, they are the second-largest First Nations population, surpassed only by the the United States, they have the fifth-largest population among Native.

Book from Project Gutenberg: Ethnobotany of the Ojibwe Indians Ojibwa Indians -- Ethnobotany, Plants -- Wisconsin, Plants -- Minnesota Publisher Project Gutenberg Collection gutenberg Contributor Project Gutenberg Language en.

Book from Project Gutenberg: Ethnobotany of the Ojibwe Indians Addeddate Call number gutenberg. This bulletin is the third in a series of six, recounting the field work done among Wisconsin Indians to discover their present uses of native or introduced plants and, insofar as is possible, the history of these plant uses by their ancestors.

As far back as Hoffman[85] reported that the medic. Ethnobotany of the Navajo (Albuquerque, N.M., University of New Mexico Press, ), by Francis Hapgood Elmore and N.M.) School of American Research (Santa Fe (page images at HathiTrust) Ethnobotany of the Ojibwe Indians, (Milwaukee, Wis., Published by order of the Trustees, []), by Huron H.

Smith (page images at HathiTrust). Read "Ethnobotany of the Ojibwe Indians" by Huron H. Smith. Once you install this app, you can read it by 1-click without connecting network.

You can also check your "Reading Score" from the ry: BOOKS_AND_REFERENCE. Ethnobotany of the Ojibwe Indians Kindle Edition by Huron H.

Smith (Author) Format: Kindle Edition. out of 5 stars 1 rating. See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions. Amazon Price New from Used from 5/5(1). Ojibwe / oʊ ˈ dʒ ɪ b w eɪ /, also known as Ojibwa / oʊ ˈ dʒ ɪ b w ə /, Ojibway or Otchipwe, is an indigenous language of North America of the Algonquian language family.

The language is characterized by a series of dialects that have local names and frequently local writing is no single dialect that is considered the most prestigious or most prominent, Ethnicity: Ojibwe people. Ethnobotany, traditional Native American Indian plant knowledge.

Links for on-line orders fromweb bookstore. Books in context, reviewed, cultural material helps you make good choices. Visit some research databases. Peacock, Thomas and Marlene Wisuri. "Ojibwe Waasa Inaabidaa: We Look in All Directions." Afton Historical Society Press, Smith, Huron H.

"Ethnobotany of the Ojibwe Indians." Bulletin of the Public Museum of the City of Milwaukee, vol. 4, no. 3,pp. Struthers, Roxanne and Felicia S. Hodge. "Sacred Tobacco Use in Ojibwe. Article citations.

More>> Smith, H. Ethnobotany of the Ojibwe Indians. Bulletin of the Public Museum of Milwaukee, 4, has been cited by the following article. File: From Wikimedia Commons, the free media repository. Jump to navigation Jump to search.

File; File history; File usage on Commons; Metadata; Size of this JPG preview of this PDF file: × pixels. Native Americans are renowned for their medicinal plant knowledge.

It is rumored they first started using plants and herbs for healing after watching animals eat certain plants when they were sick. In order to protect these plants from over harvesting, the medicine men used to pick every third plant they found. Ethnobotany of the Ojibwe Indians by Huron H.

Smith. Published by Good Press. Good Press publishes a wide range of titles that encompasses every genre. From well-known classics & literary fiction and non-fiction to forgotten−or yet undiscovered gems−of world literature, Pages: ^ Smith, Huron H.,Ethnobotany of the Ojibwe Indians, Bulletin of the Public Museum of Milwaukeepage ^ Densmore, Frances Uses of Plants by the Chippewa Indians.

SI-BAE Annual Report # (p. ) ^ Smith, Huron H.,Ethnobotany of the Ojibwe Indians, Bulletin of the Public Museum of Milwaukee Ojibwe, Activist, Priest examines Gordon's efforts to abolish the Bureau of Indian Affairs, his membership in the Society of American Indians, and his dismissal from his Ojibwe parish and exile to a tiny community where he'd be less likely to stir up controversy.

Lewandowski illuminates a significant chapter in the struggle for Native American. - Explore lisaminner69's board "My Heritage: Ojibwa (Chippewa) Indians", followed by people on Pinterest. See more ideas about Native american indians, Native american and Native american history pins.

Native American Bloodroot Mythology Bloodroot, also known as bloodwort or Canada puccoon, is a white flower native to the eastern part of North America.

"Puccoon" is one of many American plant names to have a Native American etymology: it comes from the Powhatan Indian word poughkone or pohcoons, which was recorded by early Virginia colonists. BOOK REVIEWS and Features Menu.

Click title for more info, and to order. Return here with BACK or GO key. Coming out of the book is bearberry, best known by one of its Indian names, kinikinnik/ Its Ojibwe name is saga-ko-minagunj, "berry with spikes on it".

The leaves were smoked and used as headache remedies. of the Plants Used for Medicinal Purposes By the Creek and Seminole Tribes Kim Hutton ABSTRACT Previous studies in Native American ethnobotany on the shared use of medicinal and cultural plants between communities fail to clearly reveal if these shared uses are part of changing culture or remain a stabilizing connection between old and new tribes.

↑ Smith, Huron H.,Ethnobotany of the Ojibwe Indians, Bulletin of the Public Museum of Milwaukeepage ↑ Densmore, Frances Uses of Plants by the Chippewa Indians.

SI-BAE Annual Report # (p. Wisconsin Indians Menominee Potawatomi Ojibwe Meskwaki North American Indians ethnobotany ethnopharmacology phytochemistry This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access. PreviewCited by: 3.

The Hocak, commonly known as the Winnebago, are one of the original tribes in the present state of Wisconsin. The field notes of Huron Smith, compiled in the late s and early s, document the extensive use of plant materials by Hocak people.

Smith's notes contain references to vascular plant species in 74 families, with recorded uses for of Cited by:   Smith, Huron H.,Ethnobotany of the Ojibwe Indians, Bulletin of the Public Museum of Milwaukeepage They use the roots of Solidago rigida, using a decoction of root as an enema Densmore, Frances,Uses of Plants by the Chippewa Indians, SI-BAE Annual Report #, page (Note: This source comes from the %(1).

In this chapter we will familiarize the reader with selected aspects of the herbal medicine of Wisconsin Indians. We will concentrate on the Menominee, Potawatomi, Ojibwe and.

Book of Ojibwe traditions about the meaning of cat tails and other woodland and prairie plants. Native Plant Stories: Excellent collection of Native American stories about plants, by Abenaki storyteller Joseph Bruchac.

Native American Ethnobotany: Comprehensive book on the names and traditional uses of plants throughout Native North America.

The Ojibwe (also Ojibwa or Ojibway), Anishinaabe (also Anishinabe) or Chippewa (also Chippeway) are the largest groups of Native Americans–First Nations north of are divided between Canada and the United Canada, they are the second-largest population among First Nations, surpassed only by the United States, they had the fourth-largest.

(Vestal, Paul A.,The Ethnobotany of the Ramah Navaho, Papers of the Peabody Museum of American Archaeology and Ethnology 40(4), pages 50) Ojibwa Drug, Hunting Medicine detail (Smith, Huron H.,Ethnobotany of the Ojibwe Indians, Bulletin of the Public Museum of Milwaukeepages ) Potawatomi Drug, Veterinary Aid.

Ethnobotany of the Tewa Indians Medicinal plants in Malaysia‎ (1 C, 1 F) Pages in category "Ethnobotany" This category contains only the following page.

G. User:Gtaf/Ethnobotanique en Tunisie; Media in category "Ethnobotany" 1, × 1, pages; MB. Evergreen Huckleberry.(Vestal, Paul A.,The Ethnobotany of the Ramah Navaho, Papers of the Peabody Museum of American Archaeology and Ethnology 40(4), pages 46) Ojibwa Drug, Diuretic detail (Smith, Huron H.,Ethnobotany of the Ojibwe Indians, Bulletin of the Public Museum of Milwaukeepages ) Ojibwa Food, Dried Food detail.Ojibwe, also known as Ojibwa, Ojibway or Otchipwe, is an indigenous language of North America of the Algonquian language family.

The language is characterized by a series of dialects that have local names and frequently local writing systems. There is no single dialect that is considered the most prestigious or most prominent, and no standard writing system that covers all dialects.